Making a Successful Case for Maintenance

By Jay Pearlman

Many facilities management professionals find themselves struggling daily in the competition to secure funds for maintenance projects. Against the more highly visible funding needs for financial aid and faculty salaries, facilities’ needs often comes in a distant third when it comes time to prioritize the allocation of finite funds.

Today, facilities managers must add to their list of responsibilities the task of making the case for funding for critical maintenance tasks and improvements. Fortunately, the right tools for communicating this need to financial decision makers are readily at hand.

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Using Effective EAM to Improve Asset Utilization & Reduce Costs

By focusing on people and operational improvement, such an EAM program can significantly improve asset utilization rates while reducing long-term capital costs. That attention to people and operations is an essential element of EAM success, however, strategies centered alone on capital investments in facilities and fleet logistics typically fall short of the significant benefits an effective EAM effort can produce. Continue reading

Internal Clearance & Its Effect on Bearing Fatigue Life

by Miles Woodard and Ryan Thomas

End users must include bearing clearance as an integral part of designing or building a pump.

Internal clearance is one of the most important factors affecting bearing performance within pump applications. The bearing’s internal clearance is the relative movement of the outer and inner rings when they are lightly pushing in opposite directions. Movement in the diametrical direction is defined as radial clearance. Movement in the shaft’s direction is axial clearance.
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10 Steps to Achieve World-Class Manufacturing Maintenance Practices

by Jeff Owens, Advanced Technology Services

Lean out your maintenance process and deliver cost savings and greater efficiency.

Manufacturers worldwide know that Lean maintenance practices cut costs and improve production by minimizing downtime. But the reality is that for many U.S. manufacturers, up to 90% of the maintenance they perform is conducted on a reactive rather than proactive basis. Some blame the age of their equipment, the absence of spare parts and the rapid pace of manufacturing.

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Releasing Asset Value Sustainably – An Analysis of ISO55000x

A lot of information, time and energy has been devoted recently to emerging and established practices in asset management. This interest, however, actually has a far longer history. Protocols have been undergoing continuous development and evolution for the past 50 years to keep pace with discoveries, expansion and globalization of industries. Cataclysmic events have often been the driving force for positive change because they expose serious operational and management flaws that are responsible for unmitigated risks and exposing people and the environment to harm. Over time, regulations and standards have matured not only to preempt failure, but also to define improved ways to proactively manage physical assets. Figure 1 captures the four traditional risk-based strategies for asset management. Continue reading

The Story of a Work Order

by Tarek Atout

Once upon a time in a maintenance department, a work order woke up in the morning, feeling very lazy, unable to open his eyes or get up to walk. It’s been a long time for him in the same room, nobody knocks on the door to say hello, how are you, or to release him so he can show his presence. He looks in the mirror and finds he has changed a lot since being created and kept in the backlog. Looking at gray hair covering his head, he tries to remember his lifecycle since that day when he became a pending order waiting for spare parts to arrive. This spurred his friends to give him the nickname, “Nomat.” Continue reading

How to Build a High Performance Maintenance Team

A few years ago, this author inherited perhaps the world’s most underperforming, unreliable, unpredictable, unacceptable and all other antonyms that are an antithesis for anything positive, maintenance team. The extreme lack of performance left all sorts of carnage piled up at the front door of the unemployment office. Maintenance managers did not last longer than 18 months before quitting or getting fired. To be fair, it was the result of long-term neglect and a few bad decisions by upper management. Nonetheless, the requirements of the job was to roll up the shirt sleeves, do a deep dive and fix it. Continue reading